Where to Go

A variety of services for mental health, IDD, alcohol and drug addictions, and Alzheimer’s disease and other Dementia are available across the state. To find the nearest DMH Certified Service Providers in your area, use the search form below and enter your county. Please contact the certified provider directly regarding availability of services.

DMH Certified Service Providers

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15th Annual Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Psychiatric Disorders in Older Adults

In an effort to address the needs of people suffering from or caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, the Mississippi Department of Mental Health’s (DMH) Division of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia is presenting the 15th Annual Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Psychiatric Disorders in Older Adults. “Making Every  Day Count” will be held August 20 – 22, 2014 at the MSU Riley Center in Meridian, Mississippi.

August 20 – August 22, 2014

15th Annual Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Psychiatric Disorders in Older Adults

“Making Every Day Count”

MSU Riley Center

Meridian, MS

 

Register online at:  http://www.regonline.com/msalzconference2014

 

2014 Alzheimer’s Conference Host Vendor Packet

 

2014 Alzheimer’s Conference Registration Brochure

 

2014 Alzheimer’s Conference Award Nomination Form

 

General Conference Information

 

 

 

7th Annual MS School For Addiction Professionals April 1-4

In an effort to help educate Mississippi’s Addiction, Treatment, and Prevention Professionals, about alcohol and drug abuse and prevention the 7th Annual Mississippi School for Addiction Professionals, hosted by the Mississippi Department of Mental Health’s (DMH) Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Services, will be held April 1-4 at the Hattiesburg Convention Center.

 

“We provide a learning experience where professionals or nonprofessionals can come together to learn from innovative individuals who are leaders in the field of substance abuse treatment and prevention,” said Dr. Jerri Avery, DMH Director of the Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Services.  “The MS School is an excellent way to educate people on the best practices available to produce the best outcomes for those we serve.”

 

The MS School for Addiction Professionals will offer exciting plenary sessions, special events and a variety of courses in prevention, intervention and treatment, all of which are designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of each participant. The MS School offers many courses that address contemporary topics to help professionals remain abreast as to the latest trends in their areas. The MS School is open to treatment professionals, service providers, educators, parents, nurses, social workers, school counselors, law enforcement, faith based organizations, concerned citizens and others.

 

Keynote presenters include: Dr. Chip Dodd, When Does Therapy Become Therapeutic?; Dr. David Mee-Lee, Understanding DSM-5; David Mineta, Deputy Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy; Dr. Earl Suttle, Enjoying Excellence – Becoming the Best You Can Be; Jamie Huysman, Run Towards the Roar; and Kelly Wilson, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT).

Substance abuse disorders don’t just affect the individual, but their family, friends and the community. Thousands of Mississippians are in recovery from alcohol and drug abuse. They are neighbors, friends and family members leading healthy and productive lives in our communities.

 

More than 23 million people, aged 12 or older, needed treatment for a substance use disorder in the United States in 2007, and in Mississippi alone, 183,000 people and their families are affected by this disease. Each year, the alcohol and drug residential treatment centers in Mississippi certified by DMH’s Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Services, provide residential treatment to more than 6,000 Mississippians suffering from substance abuse and dependence problems.

 

For more information about The Mississippi School for Addiction Professionals, contact 601-359-1288 or visit www.themsschool.ms.gov. If you or someone you know is in need of treatment, call the DMH’s Helpline at 1-877-210-8513.

DMH Mobile Crisis Response Teams

DMH Mobile Crisis Response Teams

Grant to Help Improve Co-Occurring Treatment for Mississippi Adolescents

Over the next four years, the Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) plans to improve assessment and treatment services for adolescents with co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders through the use of a $3.8 million, four-year grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

The Mississippi State Adolescent Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (MS SYT-ED) project will strengthen the State’s systems to serve adolescents, ages 12 – 18, with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders by developing two learning sites in Mississippi for evidence-based treatment for adolescents. The two learning sites will help develop a blueprint for policies, procedures, and financing structures that can be used to widen the use of evidence-based substance abuse treatment practices in Mississippi. The two learning sites will identify barriers to access and treatment, and test solutions that can be applied throughout the state for adolescents and their families.

“This grant will profoundly impact the way we treat adolescents with mental illness and substance abuse in our state,” said Pam Smith, MS SYT-ED Program Manager. “A key to this grant is the dissemination of information. We want to share what we learn through the two collaborative sites with the entire State in order to better address the treatment of adolescents and their need for recovery support through improved integration and efficiency of services.”

According to SmartTrack, Mississippi adolescents exhibit an exceptionally early age of alcohol onset, persistent use of marijuana, methamphetamines, prescription drugs and other gateway drugs. Various statewide assessments of substance use among youth in Mississippi indicate that about 64.8% of high school students reported having used alcohol at least once in their lifetime, 19.3 % reported binge alcohol use in the past 30 days. In addition, adolescents coming into substance use treatment often have co-occurring substance use and mental health problems. Among adolescents aged 12-17 years entering into substance abuse treatment in 2009 in Mississippi, an estimated 11.6% had a co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorder.

“The statistics alone clearly show the need for the very best evidence-based treatment for our youth,” said Pam Smith, MS SYT-ED Program Manager. “Families who have a child with a mental illness and are dealing with a substance abuse issue need access to treatment and real-time solutions. We want to find the gaps in the system and develop strategies to address the gaps in order to give these youth a better future.”

Anticipated outcomes of this project include:
· decreased juvenile justice involvement for adolescents,
· increased rates of abstinence,
· increased enrollment in education, vocational training and/or employment,
· increased positive social connectedness, and
· increased access, service use, and outcomes among adolescents most vulnerable to health disparities.
·
Community Mental Health Centers, Free-Standing nonprofit, and private nonprofit centers who have a two year history of providing co-occurring treatment services to adolescents (ages 12-18) who are interested in applying to become one of the two collaborative learning sites, can receive more information by contacting DMH at 601-359-1288 or visiting www.dmh.state.ms.us. Any agency that applies must be in compliance with all State/Federal/Tribal licensing, accreditation, and certification requirements.

For a copy of the RFP, click on this link Mississippi RFP SYT-ED 2013

DMH Celebrates National Recovery Month

Ask your friend or neighbor if they have been touched by substance abuse or mental illness in any way and the answer is almost always – ‘yes.’ Substance abuse and mental health issues are serious public health problems in Mississippi. In 2012, an estimated 199,000 Mississippians needed treatment services for alcohol and drug use and more than 165,000 people for a mental health issue.
 
During September, Mississippi joins the nation in celebrating National Recovery Month. Recovery is a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. Recovery is unique to each individual and can truly only be defined by the individual themselves. What might be recovery for one person may be only part of the process for another. Supports and services help people with mental illness and substance abuse issues in their recovery journeys.
 
Mississippian David Connell says his experiences and struggles during his recovery journey have allowed him to share his story with others and to make a positive impact. “To me, recovery means being able to make a meaningful contribution,” said Connell, a Certified Peer Support Specialist. “What really worked for me in my recovery journey was having structure and purpose in my life. That has allowed me to make a positive impact and work to decrease the stigma associated with mental health.”
 
To celebrate recovery, the Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Mississippi Peer Support Specialist Network is continuing their public awareness campaign, Think Recovery. During the next year, all DMH certified providers will be encouraged to continue educate their staff on the 10 + 1 Components of Recovery. These components include: Self-Direction, Individualized and Person-Centered, Empowerment, Holistic, Non-Linear, Strengths-Based, Peer Support, Respect, Responsibility, Hope, and Resiliency.
 
Gulf Coast resident Melody Worsham says the road to recovery isn’t always perfect, but you learn from the trials and continue with the journey. “When a traveler pulls off to the side of the road to fix a tire, we do not consider that a failed trip, and we would not declare that the person will not make it back on the road,” said Worsham, President of the Mississippi Peer Support Specialist Network. “I have never heard of anyone who pulls off the road and decides to stay there. Traveling through life is like that. Sometimes we get a flat and linger at a plateau of recovery until repairs can be made. Sometimes we go too fast and pay the penalty. Other times, we limp along the shoulder until we can get to a rest stop and refuel. And then there are times when the road conditions couldn’t be more perfect. It isn’t just the perfect road trip that we count as recovery. The entire trip is recovery as long as we keep our destination in focus.”
 
Videos of personal stories of recovery and community integration will be highlighted each month during the next year in conjunction with the Think Recovery campaign. 
 
Recovery not only benefits the individual, it benefits the entire community. One of the first steps is to understand that behavioral health is an essential part of overall health. Most people don’t think twice about seeking treatment for diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure or other health conditions. People should seek treatment for substance abuse and mental health with the same urgency as they would any other health condition.
 
“After nine years in recovery, I have learned that you have to take action, realize it’s ok to ask for help, set a goal, and get involved with helping others,” said June Boudreaux, Certified Peer Support Specialist. “It’s about how to cope and face problems that come up in your everyday life. Recovery is about living a good, productive life. I’m not living in the problem anymore; I’m living in the solution.”
 
The Mississippi Peer Support Specialist Network are first degree family members and/or people living in recovery with mental illness, substance abuse, and intellectual and developmental disabilities that provide support to others who can benefit from their lived experiences. If you or someone you know is in need of services and supports, call the DMH’s 24 hour-a-day, 7 days a week at 1-877-210-8513 or visit www.dmh.ms.gov. 
 
For more information about Think Recovery, click here http://www.dmh.ms.gov/think-recovery/.  

Raise Alzheimer’s Awareness By Painting It Purple September 20

The Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH), Alzheimer’s Association Mississippi Chapter, and the UMMC MIND Center  wants Mississippians to help paint the state purple on September 20 in honor of Alzheimer’s Action Day.
 
Mississippians are encouraged to wear purple and display purple ribbons/bows on their homes and offices to show their support for people with Alzheimer’s disease and the loved ones who care for them. People are also encouraged to host a Paint It Purple! event in their city and/or workplace.
 
“Paint It Purple! is about increasing awareness of this devastating disease,” said Kathy Van Cleave, Director of DMH’s Division of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia. “By opening up the dialogue, we can bring Alzheimer’s the attention it deserves. We are doing a lot to encourage awareness, education, and support, but there is so much more that needs to be done.”
 
The emotional, physical and financial toll can be difficult for the estimated 53,000 Mississippians diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. In 2010, there were 916 Alzheimer’s disease related deaths in Mississippi. By 2025, it is estimated more than 65,000 Mississippians will have Alzheimer’s disease.
 
“These figures are not simply statistics,” said Patty Dunn, Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association Mississippi Chapter. “It is a mother or a father, a brother or a sister or a friend.  This global Alzheimer’s disease epidemic demands an enormous amount of attention.  Paint It Purple!  is a giant leap towards raising awareness of Alzheimer’s disease.  The Alzheimer’s Association Mississippi Chapter is proud to stand beside DMH and wear purple with a purpose.”
 
According to the National Alzheimer’s Association warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease include:
•             Memory loss that disrupts daily life
•             Challenges in planning or solving problems
•             Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure
•             Confusion with time or place
•             Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
•             New problems with words in speaking or writing
•             Misplacing things or losing the ability to retrace steps
•             Decreased or poor judgment
•             Withdrawal from work or social activities
•             Changes in mood and personality
 
For more information, contact DMH at 601-359-1288 or the Alzheimer’s Association Mississippi Chapter at 601-987-0020 or visit www.dmh.ms.gov. Let us know how you chose to Paint It Purple!  Submit your photo to the Division of Alzheimer’s at kathy.vancleave@dmh.state.ms.us

The MH/IDD Joint Conference is set for October 29, 2013 to October 31, 2013 at the IP Casino in Biloxi.

Mark Your Calendars: The MH/IDD Joint Conference is set for October 29 – 31 at the IP Casino in Biloxi. The theme is Community: The Pathway to Belonging. Please click the following link below to register:

  • Planning forms have been submitted for the following disciplines:
    • Recreation Therapist (ATRA)

 

  • 10.5 Hours of Continuing Education Credit has been awarded for the following disciplines:
    • Continuing Medical Education
    • (DMH) Mental Health Therapist
    • (DMH) Addictions Therapist
    • (DMH) Community Support Specialist
    • (DMH) Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Therapist
    • Licensed DMH Administrator
    • (DMH) Peer Support Specialist
    • Psychologist (APA)
      • Also accredited for 1.5 hours of APA Ethics/Legal hours
    • Social Worker (MBOE)
      • Also accredited for 6.5 hours of SW Cultural Diversity
      • Also accredited for 1.5 hours of SW Ethics
    • Counselor/ LPC (NBCC)
      • Also accredited for 1.5 hours of LPC Ethics
    • CHES (Certified Health Education Specialist)
    • Alcohol and Drug Counselor (NAADAC)

 

  • 10.0 Hours of Continuing Education Credit has been awarded for the following disciplines:
    • Nursing Home Administrator

 

  • 1.05 CEU’s have been awarded for the following disciplines:
    • University CEUs/Teacher

 

 

  • Click the link below to download the conference agenda.

Response To Mental Health Conference In Washington

On June 3, the President and Vice President hosted a National Conference on Mental Health in Washington. While millions of Americans and thousands of Mississippians struggle with mental health problems, those who need help are many times afraid to seek it because of the shame and secrecy unfortunately associated with mental illness. The conference brought together people from access the country, including mental health advocates, educators, health care providers, faith leaders, and individuals who have struggled with mental health problems, to discuss how we can all work together to reduce stigma, and help people struggling with mental health problems recognize the importance of reaching out for assistance.
 
Mental health problems are surprisingly common. In fact, they affect most families at some point. Studies also show that most people with mental illnesses get better and many recover completely. Recovery not only benefits the individual, it benefits the entire community. One major barrier to recovery, however, is stigma – the aura of shame and blame that surrounds mental health problems. This fear of mental health problems is a major problem in itself. Stigma gets in the way of proper treatment and recovery. There are ways, however, to counter stigma and our goal is to have the entire state of Mississippi join our efforts to combat stigma. Share the facts about mental health problems and about people with these problems. Speak up if you hear or read something that isn’t true. Treat people with mental health needs with respect and dignity, as you would anybody else. Don’t label people with mental health problems by using terms like “crazy.” Support people with mental health problems by helping to develop community resources. Teach children about mental health. Help them see that these problems are like any other illness and can be treated. These are just a few things you can do to help break down the walls of stigma.
 
According to SAMHSA the prevalence of serious mental health conditions in the 18-25 years of age group is almost double that of the general population, yet young people have the lowest rate of help-seeking behaviors. This group has a high potential to minimize future disability if social acceptance is broadened and they receive the right support and services early on. This is one of the reasons the Mississippi Department of Mental Health (DMH) launched a public awareness campaign, Think Again, which targets young adults in 2009. The opportunity for recovery is more likely in a society of acceptance, and this initiative is meant to inspire young people to serve as the mental health vanguard, motivating a societal change toward acceptance and decreasing the negative attitudes that surround mental illness.
 
We must remember that behavioral health is an essential part of overall health. Most people don’t think twice about seeking treatment for diabetes, asthma, high blood pressure or other health conditions. As a nation and a state, we need to change the way we look at mental illness in order to dispel the stigma. This also includes the way we look at recovery. Last year, DMH launched an awareness campaign focusing on the definition and components of recovery. Recovery is a process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. Recovery is unique to each individual and can truly only be defined by the individual themselves. What might be recovery for one person may be only part of the process for another. Supports and services help people with mental illness and substance abuse issues in their recovery journeys.
 
We all possess the fundamental and inherent value to be accepted and treated with respect and worth. We want individuals to restore, rebuild and reclaim control of their lives by increasing their resilience and focusing on their strengths. We need to remind our fellow citizens that people should seek treatment for substance abuse and mental health with the same urgency as they would any other health condition. We need to continue to have conversation on mental health in order to increase understanding and awareness for our nation and the state of Mississippi.
 
 
Ms. Diana S. Mikula
Executive Director
Mississippi Department of Mental Health

24th Annual Serendipity Is Thursday, September 5th

WHITFIELD— September is approaching fast, and art admirers across the state know what that means – Mississippi State Hospital’s annual Serendipity art show and silent auction is almost here.

Always held the first Thursday of September, this year’s Serendipity is set for Thursday, September 5, from 11:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. on the MSH campus. The art show and silent auction plays host to artwork created solely by patients and residents of the hospital’s Art Services program and has through the decades become a draw for people from all over the state who know they’ll find pieces there they won’t be able to get anywhere else.

“Serendipity has been described as one of Mississippi’s best kept secrets, and I think that’s definitely true,” Art Services Director Evelyn Bates said. “The state has a rich tradition in music, literature, and art, and the work on display in Serendipity continues that tradition.”

The art and ceramic work on display in the show is all created by individuals served through the MSH Art Services Department. They are patients from across the hospital’s services, including adults and children served at the hospital and residents of Jaquith Nursing Home, located on the MSH campus.

The art program gives them a chance to express themselves through their work, whether they have any formal training in the arts or not. For many, it is an important part of the therapeutic process.

“The act of creating the work has a real therapeutic value for many of our artists, and then seeing it on display during Serendipity gives the artists a real feeling of success and a boost to their self-esteem, knowing that other people place such a high value on it,” Bates said.

And people do place value on the work – all of the pieces on display are also available to own via silent auction. Interested visitors just need to write a bid down on the available forms, and if they have the highest offer when bidding closes at 6 p.m. they’ll get to take it home with them.

Everyone is welcome to attend the show, but visitors don’t need to be present to win – all they have to do is have the highest bid that was placed. Anyone really setting their sights on a specific piece will probably want to be there when bidding ends though, since the closing minutes have been known to see some people scrambling around trying to leave their competitors with no time to spare for a higher bid of their own.

Last year was a record for Serendipity, with every single piece that was available ending up with a bid on it. As in years past, this year’s selection will include including paintings, drawings, collages and ceramics.

“No two years are alike, and no two pieces are the same,” Bates said. “We’re looking forward to showcasing our artists’ skill and will be happy for everyone to come see the work they have created.”

MSH, a program of the Mississippi Department of Mental Health, was founded in 1855 and facilitates improvement in the quality of life for Mississippians who are in need of mental health, chemical dependency or nursing home services by rehabilitating to the least restrictive environment and utilizing a range of psychiatric and medical services that reflect the accepted standard of care and are in compliance with statutory and regulatory guidelines. The hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission.

 

 

MSH Art Instructor Ron Lindsey looks over some of the pieces in last year’s show before the bidding began. 2012 was a record year for Serendipity, with every piece on display bid on and purchased by visitors.

 

 

Pictured below is one of the pieces that will be on display in this year’s Serendipity art show and silent auction at Mississippi State Hospital on Thursday, September 5. Artwork will include paintings in a variety of media as well as ceramics. Bidding will be open from 11:30 a.m. until 6 p.m., and the show is open to the public.

 

 

Pictured below is an Serendipity 2013 Invite Card

14th Annual Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Psychiatric Disorders in the Elderly

August 14 – August 16, 2013

14th Annual Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease and Psychiatric Disorders in the Elderly

“Shaping the Future”

Host/Vendor check-in Tuesday, August 13, 2013

MSU Riley Center    Meridian, MS

Register online at http://www.regonline.com/msalzconference2013

Request for support letter

2013 Alzheimer’s Conference Host Vendor Registration Packet

2013 Alzheimer’s Conference Registration Brochure

2013 Alzheimer’s Conference Award Nomination

General Conference Information


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